Canadian registered aircraft licensing options


Owner Maintenance category:

This option gives owner of a certified aircraft most of the privileges of an amateur built aircraft without the hassle of building it. Currently the aircraft are not permitted to cross the border. Transport Canada & COPA are working on this & expect Owner Maintenance aircraft will be granted this privilege soon. You cannot sell an aircraft of this category in the U.S. Both V-8 powered Seabees flying are licensed in this category. The process is easy to follow.

For information on this process refer to COPA Guide to owner maintenance included in this site or contact Transport Canada.

Amateur Built Category:

You currently cannot take a certified aircraft & license it as an amateur built aircraft. You can however build an amateur built aircraft using mostly certified aircraft components. You must simply comply with the "51%" rule checklist. The only confusing part is that the 51% checklist has nothing to do with 51% of the work being done. It is simply a scorecard. You the owner (or someone you hire to do the work) must complete 51% of the items on the Transport Canada approved checklist. The R.A.A. administers the program. There have been several Cessna 185 & 206 "replicas" built & licensed as amateur built aircraft. These aircraft are eligible for export to the U.S. & are permitted to cross the border. It is important to note you cannot call the aircraft a Seabee. It must be called something else eg. A Robinson V-8 powered Bee. The name Seabee refers to a certified aircraft. If you call the R.A.A. & tell them you are going to build an amateur built Seabee you will be turned down. If you call the RAA & tell them you are going to build a Robinson V-8 powered Bee (or any other name of you're choice) they will instruct you to complete a 51% evaluation sheet & have it reviewed by one of their designated inspectors.

For further information on this process contact the RAA at www.md-ra.com or call 1-877-419-2111. If you require assistance with the process please contact us.

United States registered aircraft licensing options

In the U.S. the only viable licensing option we have been able to identify is compliance with the amateur built rules. In theory the aircraft could be licensed by using a one time STC or via the 337 process. We have been unable to find an inspector willing to do this. The amateur built process is as follows

You currently cannot take a certified aircraft & license it as an amateur built aircraft. You can however build an amateur built aircraft using mostly certified aircraft components. You must simply comply with the "51%" rule checklist. The only confusing part is that the 51% checklist has nothing to do with 51% of the work being done. It is simply a scorecard. You the owner must complete 51% of the items on the FAA approved checklist. There have been several Cessna 185 & 206 "replicas" built & licensed as amateur built aircraft. These aircraft are eligible for export to Canada & are permitted to cross the border. You may also import a Canadian amateur built aircraft into the U.S. It is important to note you cannot call the aircraft a Seabee. It must be called something else eg. A Robinson V-8 powered Bee. The name Seabee refers to a certified aircraft. If you call the FAA & tell them you are going to build an amateur built Seabee you will be turned down. If you call the FAA & tell them you are going to build a Robinson V-8 powered Bee (or any other name of you're choice) they will instruct you to complete a 51% evaluation sheet & have it reviewed by one of their designated inspectors. The checklist is found on the FAA web site

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